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4-stage bowel obstruction diet

For the nutritional management of bowel obstruction related to cancer

Who is this advice for?

The information in this advice sheet is for you if you:

  • Have been diagnosed with bowel obstruction
  • Are at risk of developing bowel obstruction
  • Have a mass in your small or large intestine (bowel) and are at risk of a blockage
  • Have delayed emptying of the stomach

What information is provided here?

  • Why is it important to eat the right sort of foods?
  • How to use this information
  • The 4-stage bowel obstruction diet
    • Stage 1: Clear fluids only
    • Stage 2: All thin liquids
    • Stage 3: Smooth and purĂ©ed low fibre foods
    • Stage 4: Soft sloppy low fibre foods
  • After stage 4
  • References / further reading
  • Contact details

Why is it important for me to eat the right sort of foods with bowel obstruction?

If you have a mass in your small or large intestine (also known as bowel or gut), or it is narrower than normal, you may be at risk of a blockage. You may have already been admitted to hospital with a blockage (when you are not able to open your bowels).

Some foods pass through our body without being broken down properly. They can pass through in big pieces and can increase your risk of a blockage by getting caught in a narrow space. For example:

  • the skins, pips and seeds of fruit and vegetables
  • fibrous fruits e.g. rhubarb, celery
  • raw or undercooked vegetables
  • vegetables that humans are unable to digest e.g. mushrooms, sweetcorn, lettuce and other salad leaves
  • bread and bread products e.g. crumpets, muffins, doughnuts, since they form a bolus (ball) and may not pass through a narrowed space.

Fibre also makes our stools form a ‘bulk’ and makes them solid. When you are at risk of bowel obstruction it is better to avoid stools that are too solid. This is why you are encouraged to have a low fibre diet.

Certain foods may also lead to symptoms such as pain, bloating, feeling full, feeling sick and tightness across your abdomen (stomach). You may also find it harder to pass a bowel motion.

You have been given this booklet because changing your diet can lower your risk of a blockage. Eating the right foods for you may help to reduce your symptoms.


How do I use this information?

This advice is only to be given to you under the care of a Registered Dietitian. The information needs to be carefully explained to you so that you know how to use it.

There is limited evidence to establish the best diet to follow when you are diagnosed with the risk of bowel obstruction. Everyone is different and no day is the same.

Depending on your situation, you may need to make more changes than others. This booklet is divided into 4 stages. You will find it helpful to read carefully through the information provided so that you understand what to do. You may also find it helpful to write down any questions you have about the diet. Please always ask your dietitian if you are not sure about what to do.

You will have to eat very differently with this diet. It is important not to eat or drink large amounts of food or fluid in one sitting. You may find it hard to change the habit of ‘3 meals per day’. If you are at risk of bowel obstruction eating and drinking ‘little and often’ will help with your symptoms.

Your dietitian will let you know which stage you should be following. They will also advise you when you can move to the next stage.

You may find that you have to go backwards and forwards through the stages depending on your symptoms. For example, if you are in pain or your bowels stop working, you will have to return to liquids for a while until your symptoms settle again.

You are likely to need to use nutritional supplement drinks at certain times to make sure that you are meeting your nutritional needs.


The 4 stage Bowel Obstruction diet

  Stage 1   Clear fluids only
  Stage 2   ALL thin liquids
  Stage 3   Smooth or puréed foods only
Low fibre
  Stage 4   Soft sloppy foods
Low fibre

Please ask your nurse/ doctor for help if you are concerned.

Make a note of your healthcare professional’s phone number and email address.

Stage 1: Clear fluids ONLY

What can I drink for Stage 1?

You need to follow Stage 1 if you have had a complete blockage. When your bowels start to open regularly again you will be encouraged to start to sip on CLEAR LIQUIDS only.

You will need to follow Stage 1 if you have proceeded to Stage 2, 3 or 4 and start to develop symptoms.

Only clear liquids are allowed. Examples are:

  • Water
  • Black tea
  • Black coffee
  • Squash
  • Smooth clear fruit juice e.g. apple, cranberry juice
  • Flavoured water
  • OasisÂź, RubiconÂź (still), VimtoÂź
  • Coconut water
  • Herbal and fruit teas
  • Clear consommĂ© soup (no bits)
  • Clear miso soup
  • Hot cup of MarmiteÂź or BovrilÂź
  • Hot cup of water with a dissolved stock cube or stock pot
  • Still isotonic sports drinks e.g. Lucozade SportÂź, Gatorade SportÂź, PoweradeÂź

You can also suck on boiled sweets and mints. These must not be chewed and swallowed in pieces.

Try to sip on small amounts of drinks through the day. This is the easiest way to increase your intake of liquids. It will help to stop you getting dehydrated.

Which supplement drinks do I need during Stage 1?

It is not possible to meet your nutritional needs on clear fluids so your dietitian or doctor will prescribe nutritional supplements.

Stage 2: All thin liquids

What can I drink for Stage 2?

If your bowels have been opening regularly and your symptoms from bowel obstruction have settled, you will be advised to move to Stage 2. This means that you can have ALL forms of liquids.

It is important to introduce the drinks in Stage 2 very gradually. This will let your body tell you if you can tolerate the changes and continue with Stage 2.  Each day add one extra drink. If you increase slowly you are more likely to be able to stay on Stage 2 and will not get symptoms that mean you need to go back to Stage 1.

Please remember:

  • The liquids need to be a thin consistency i.e. no thicker than whole milk.
  • The liquids need to be completely smooth with no bits.
  • The liquids need to be low in fibre e.g. thin smooth fruit juice with no bits – no smoothies.

The following drinks provide energy, protein and vitamins and minerals. Always use whole milk where possible.

 Whole milk / milk with NesquikŸ or MiloŸ  Milky coffee / latté / cappuccino
 Yoghurt drinks  Hot chocolate
 Thin milkshakes e.g. FrijjŸ, YopŸ, YazooŸ  HorlicksŸ / OvaltineŸ
 Thin smooth soups e.g. chicken, oxtail, sweet potato, butternut squash  Thin smooth fruit juice (no bits)
 Thin custard  Jelly / milky jelly
 Smooth ice cream, smooth frozen yoghurt, sorbet (no bits)  Ice lollies, Mini MilkŸ lollies, frozen yoghurt lollies

You can also suck on boiled sweets, mints and smooth chocolate. These must not be chewed and swallowed in pieces.

You can also include the clear fluids from Stage 1.

Try to sip on small amounts of drinks throughout the day. This is the easiest way to increase your intake of liquids. It will help to stop you getting dehydrated.

Which supplement drinks do I need during Stage 2?

It may not be possible to meet your nutritional needs on liquids only so your dietitian or doctor will prescribe nutritional supplements.

What do I do if my symptoms return?

If you start to experience any of the following, please contact your doctor or dietitian immediately.

  • Nausea (feeling sick)
  • Vomiting
  • Feeling full after drinking
  • Your bowels do not open for more than 2 days
  • A feeling of ‘tightness’ across your stomach
  • Feeling bloated
  • Abdominal (tummy) swelling
  • Abdominal (tummy) pain.

These symptoms could be a sign that your bowel may be blocked. It is important to speak to your dietitian so that they can advise you what to do. If you are unable to speak to them immediately, return to Stage 1 and clear fluids only.

Stage 3 Smooth or puréed low fibre foods

What can I eat and drink for Stage 3?

If your bowels are opening regularly and you are not in any pain after several days of Stage 2 drinks, your dietitian or doctor will ask you to move to Stage 3.

This means that you can start to eat smooth or puréed low fibre foods, as well as all liquids in Stage 1 and 2.

It is important to introduce the foods in Stage 3 very gradually. This will let your body tell you if you can tolerate the changes and continue with a smooth / purée diet.  Each day add only one extra food. If you increase slowly you are more likely to be able to stay on Stage 3 and not get symptoms that mean you need to go back to Stage 1.

  • Always eat small portions several times during the day. A usual meal pattern is not appropriate. Larger meals may increase your risk of symptoms returning.
  • Aim to eat at least 6 times each day.
  • All food needs to be smooth or should be able to melt in your mouth.
  • All food should be able to ‘fall off’ a spoon easily.
  • All food should be swallowed without needing to chew it.
  • All food should be low in fibre.
  • You can have one portion of fruit and one portion of vegetables each day ONLY. Some fruit and vegetables must be completely avoided. See the end of this information for a list of foods allowed and foods to avoid.

Tips for following a soft smooth/purée diet

  • Equipment: Using a hand blender is the simplest way of producing purĂ©ed foods.
  • PurĂ©ed foods can look more appetising if they are presented separately e.g. separate a purĂ©ed meat casserole from the (allowed) vegetables and potatoes.
  • Colour is also important e.g. try serving brightly coloured vegetables such as purĂ©ed carrots with mashed potato and purĂ©ed chicken and sauce/gravy.
  • Cooked foods should be cut into small pieces then liquidised, blended or mashed, and if necessary sieved to a smooth consistency.
  • You will need to add extra liquid to most foods before or after they have been purĂ©ed. To improve the taste and nutritional value; add whole milk, melted butter, cream or creamy soup instead of water.

What foods do I need to avoid during Stage 3?

Some foods need to be completely avoided (even if puréed). These include the pips, skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables, wholegrains, pulses and beans, which are not easily digested and may get caught in your bowel. Bread and bread products e.g. crumpets, muffins, doughnuts, also need to be avoided. They can form a bolus (ball) and may not pass through a narrowed space. This can increase your risk of an obstruction. Please look at the lists in this information for more details.

What can I eat for breakfast during Stage 3?

  • ‘Soggy’ cereal e.g. corn flakes or Rice KrispiesÂź soaked in whole milk
  • Small bowl of Ready BrekÂź made with milk
  • PurĂ©ed sweetened fruit – tinned pears, stewed fruit, fruit compote (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Full fat smooth (no lumps) yoghurt or fromage frais, Petit filouÂź, SkyrÂź yoghurt, Coconut collaborativeÂź natural yoghurt
  • Glass of fruit juice (no bits)
  • Milkshake (see Stage 2 for options)
  • Smooth scrambled egg.

Add sugar, syrup, honey, jam, cream, butter or full cream milk to add extra nutrition.

What can I eat for my meals during Stage 3?

  • Mashed potatoes / mashed sweet potatoes served with
    • purĂ©ed meats and gravy
    • purĂ©ed mince dishes
    • purĂ©ed fish and white or cheese sauce
    • purĂ©ed fish pie
    • purĂ©ed stew (made with root vegetables)
    • blended gammon or ham with white or cheese sauce
  • Jacket potato (no skin) mashed with
    • cheese and butter
    • purĂ©ed tuna mayonnaise
    • purĂ©ed egg mayonnaise
    • smooth tikka or curry sauce
  • Scrambled egg with added butter and grated cheese
  • Bowl of smooth soup
    • Soup can be homemade, bought fresh or tinned
    • Choose soups that contain vegetables from the ‘allowed’ lists on page 20
    • Always blend soup so that it is smooth
    • Creamy soups have extra nutrition

You can add one (puréed) portion of the allowed vegetables to meals that do not already contain vegetables e.g. carrots, parsnips, butternut squash, heads of broccoli or cauliflower.

Try one of the following to add flavour: redcurrant jelly, mint jelly, soy sauce, tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce, smooth mustard, TabascoÂź sauce.

Add butter, spread, cream, grated cheese, cream cheese and crĂšme fraiche to add extra nutrition.

What can I eat for pudding during Stage 3?

  • Smooth milk puddings e.g. plain or chocolate custard, ground rice pudding, semolina, tapioca
  • Sponge or other cakes blended with chocolate sauce, cream, custard or ice cream e.g. Madeleines, Battenberg, Madeira, Angel Slices, caramel cake bars, mini chocolate rolls, lemon slices
  • Blancmange, mousse, fruit fool, milk jelly, Angel DelightÂź, instant whip
  • Tinned or stewed fruit with added cream, yoghurt, crĂšme fraiche, custard or ice cream (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Apple pie blended to a smooth consistency with added cream, yoghurt, ice cream or custard (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Full fat smooth yoghurt, fromage frais, egg custard, crĂšme caramel
  • Smooth ice cream, sorbet, frozen yoghurt, Mini MilkÂź, mini MagnumÂź

Add sugar, syrup, honey, seedless jam or marmalade, lemon curd, treacle, cream, custard, ice cream, crĂšme fraiche, evaporated or condensed milk to add extra nutrition.

What can I eat for a snack during Stage 3?

Puddings can be eaten at any time of the day as a snack.

Choose ‘full fat’ products for extra nutrition.

  • ‘Dunked’ plain biscuits in a warm milky drink e.g. rich tea, NiceÂź, malted milk, custard creams
  • Sponge cake blended with chocolate sauce, cream, custard or ice cream
  • Ready-made smooth desserts, chocolate mousse, ground rice pudding
  • Bowl of cornflakes or Rice KrispiesÂź soaked in whole milk
  • Crisps that ‘melt-in-the-mouth’ e.g. SkipsÂź, WotsitsÂź, QuaversÂź or Pom BearsÂź, PringlesÂź
    • Add smooth dips e.g. sour cream, smooth guacamole, taramasalata
  • Melt in the mouth RitzÂź crackers or TucÂź biscuits with plain cream cheese (ensure this is well chewed before swallowing)
  • Spoonful of smooth nut butter e.g. almond butter, peanut butter
  • Spoonful of hazelnut spread or NutellaÂź
  • Portion of soft cheese (no bits) e.g. Laughing CowÂź, DairyleaÂź, PhiladelphiaÂź, PrimulaÂź, QuarkÂź or cream cheese

What can I drink during Stage 3?

It is important to drink plenty of fluid each day to prevent dehydration. You can choose any of the liquids listed in Stage 1 or Stage 2 on pages 6 and 7.

Which supplement drinks do I need during Stage 3?

It may not be possible to meet your nutritional needs with diet alone in Stage 3, so your dietitian or doctor may prescribe nutritional supplements.

If you start to experience any of the following, please contact your doctor or dietitian immediately.

  • Nausea (feeling sick)
  • Vomiting
  • Feeling full after drinking
  • Your bowels do not open for more than 2 days
  • A feeling of ‘tightness’ across your stomach
  • Feeling bloated
  • Abdominal (tummy) swelling
  • Abdominal (tummy) pain.

These symptoms could be a sign that your bowel may be blocked. It is important to speak to your dietitian so that they can advise you what to do. If you are unable to speak to them immediately, return to Stage 1 and clear fluids only.

Stage 4 – Soft sloppy low fibre

What can I eat and drink for Stage 4?

If your bowels are opening regularly and you are not in any pain after several days on Stage 3 consistencies, your dietitian or doctor will ask you to move to Stage 4.

This means that you can start to eat soft sloppy low fibre foods, as well as all liquids and soft smooth foods from Stages 1, 2 and 3.

It is important to introduce the foods in Stage 4 very gradually. This will let your body tell you if you can tolerate the changes and continue with a soft sloppy low fibre diet.  Each day add only one extra food. If you increase slowly you are more likely to be able to stay on Stage 4 and not get symptoms that mean you need to go back to Stage 1.

  • Always eat small portions several times during the day.
  • All food needs to be soft and sloppy.
  • All food should be chewed well before you swallow each mouthful.
  • Make sure all your meals have additional sauce or gravy to moisten them.
  • All food should be low in fibre.
  • You can have one portion of fruit and one portion of vegetables each day ONLY. Some fruit and vegetables must be avoided. See below for a list of foods allowed and foods to avoid.

Tips for following a soft sloppy diet

  • Taking foods little and often is advisable.
  • Aim for small frequent meals and snacks, rather than 3 meals per day.
  • Using sauces, butter, gravy, cream or custard can help to soften foods and keep them moist.
  • Foods can be softened by chopping, mincing and mashing.
  • Small sips of a drink can help with swallowing foods.
  • Avoid foods that need a lot of chewing or do not break down well when chewed.

What foods do I need to avoid during Stage 4?

Some foods need to be completely avoided (even if puréed). These include the pips, skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables, wholegrains, pulses and beans, which are not easily digested and may get caught in your bowel. Bread and bread products e.g. crumpets, muffins, doughnuts, also need to be avoided. They can form a bolus (ball) and may not pass through a narrowed space. This can increase your risk of an obstruction. Please look at the lists above for more details.

What can I eat for breakfast during Stage 4?

  • ‘Soggy’ cereal e.g. corn flakes or Rice KrispiesÂź soaked in whole milk
  • Ready BrekÂź with plenty of whole milk
  • PurĂ©ed sweetened fruit – tinned pears, stewed fruit, fruit compote (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Full fat smooth yoghurt, fromage frais, Petit filouÂź, SkyrÂź yoghurt, Coconut collaborativeÂź natural yoghurt
  • Glass of fruit juice (no bits)
  • Milkshake (see Stage 2 for options)
  • Omelette, scrambled, poached or soft, boiled egg.

Add butter, sugar, syrup, honey, jam, cream or full cream milk to add extra nutrition.

What can I eat for my meals during Stage 4?

You are unlikely to be able to manage your normal portions at meals. In fact it is better to eat a very small plate every time you eat. Leave it an hour, and then come back to have another small plate of the same meal. This will allow the food to pass through your gut and will reduce the chance of symptoms of pain and bloating returning.

  • Lancashire hotpot (make sure the meat is very tender and chewed well before swallowing)
  • Cottage pie / shepherd’s pie with plenty of gravy
  • Corned beef hash with plenty of gravy

 

  • Mashed potatoes / mashed sweet potatoes / peeled boiled potatoes / polenta / white couscous served with
    • Minced cooked meats with plenty of gravy or sauce
    • Poached fish in sauce (check for bones)
    • Fish pie, fish mornay
    • Tinned fish (tuna, salmon – no bones) with plenty of mayonnaise or sauce
    • Stews and casseroles
  • Eggs
    • Scrambled egg with extra butter and cheese
    • Cheese omelette with extra cheese
    • Soft poached or boiled egg
    • Fillings from quiche (no onions/or products from the avoid lists)
    • SoufflĂ©s e.g. cheese, salmon
  • Pasta (always use white pasta), dried or fresh
    • Well cooked small pasta shapes served with plenty of sauce e.g. cheese sauce, smooth tomato sauce, Bolognese sauce (made with passata)
    • Sloppy macaroni cheese
    • Tinned spaghetti or ravioli
  • Noodles
    • Egg, rice, vermicelli or udon noodles
    • Add a small portion of noodles to a smooth soup or broth (no vegetables)
    • Wontons in clear soup or broth
  • Rice (always use white rice e.g. long grain, risotto or basmati)
    • Served with curry with small pieces of tender meat or fish (more sauce than rice)
    • Served with plenty of Bolognese sauce (more sauce than rice)
  • Jacket potato (no skin) mashed with
    • cheese and butter
    • tuna mayonnaise
    • egg mayonnaise
    • tikka or curry sauce
    • coronation chicken (more sauce than chicken)
  • Bowl of creamy smooth soup
    • Chicken, oxtail, carrot and coriander, butternut squash
    • Avoid soups with lots of vegetables or soups that contain beans or lentils
  • ‘Melt-in-the-mouth’ crisps, crackers or breadsticks with
    • dips e.g. sour cream, taramasalata, smooth guacamole
    • Tuna, salmon or egg mayonnaise
    • Tinned spaghetti or ravioli
    • Avocado with flaked crab meat or prawns in a cocktail sauce

If there are no vegetables in your dish, then you can add one portion of ‘allowed’ foods to your meal.

Try one of the following to add flavour: redcurrant jelly, mint jelly, soy sauce, tomato sauce, Worcestershire sauce, smooth mustard, TabascoÂź sauce.

Add butter, spread, cream, grated cheese, cream cheese or crĂšme fraiche to add extra nutrition.

What can I eat for pudding during Stage 4?

  • Milk puddings e.g. plain or chocolate custard, rice pudding, semolina, tapioca
  • Sponge pudding or cake with cream, smooth ice cream or custard to soften. E.g. Madeleines, Battenberg, Madeira, Angel Slices, caramel cake bars, mini chocolate rolls, lemon slices
  • Blancmange, mousse, fruit fool, trifle (no pips), milk jelly, Angel DelightÂź, instant whip
  • Tinned or stewed fruit with added cream, yoghurt, crĂšme fraiche, custard or ice cream (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Apple crumble (no oats or dried fruit) softened with added  cream, yoghurt, ice cream or custard (one portion of fruit per day)
  • Full fat smooth yoghurt, fromage frais, egg custard, crĂšme caramel
  • Smooth ice cream, sorbet, frozen yoghurt, Mini MilkÂź, mini MagnumÂź
  • Add sugar, syrup, honey, seedless jam or marmalade, lemon curd, treacle, cream, custard, ice cream, crĂšme fraiche, evaporated or condensed milk to add extra nutrition.

What snacks can I eat between meals during Stage 4?

Puddings can be eaten at any time of the day as a snack.

Choose ‘full fat’ products for extra nutrition.

  • ‘Dunked’ plain biscuits in a warm milky drink e.g. rich tea, NiceÂź, malted milk, custard creams
  • Fruit fools, mousses, instant whips or crĂšme caramel
  • Bowl of corn flakes or Rice KrispiesÂź soaked in whole milk
  • Milky puddings e.g. individual pots of custard, rice pudding
  • Yoghurt or fromage frais
  • Smooth ice-cream, mini ice-creams, choc ices, frozen yoghurt
  • Smooth chocolate bars
  • Crisps that ‘melt-in-the-mouth’ e.g. SkipsÂź, WotsitsÂź, QuaversÂź, Pom BearsÂź or PringlesÂź
    • Add smooth dips e.g. sour cream, smooth guacamole, taramasalata
  • Melt in the mouth RitzÂź crackers or TucÂź biscuits with plain cream cheese (ensure this is well chewed before swallowing)
  • Spoonful of smooth nut butter e.g. almond butter, peanut butter
  • Spoonful of hazelnut spread or NutellaÂź
  • Portion of soft cheese (no bits) e.g. Laughing CowÂź, PhiladelphiaÂź, PrimulaÂź, QuarkÂź or cream cheese.

What can I drink during Stage 4?

It is important to drink plenty of fluid each day to prevent dehydration. You can choose any of the liquids listed in Stage 1 or Stage 2.

Which supplement drinks do I need during Stage 4?

It may not be possible to meet your nutritional needs on diet alone, so your dietitian or doctor will prescribe nutritional supplements.

If you start to experience any of the following, please contact your doctor or dietitian

immediately.

  • Nausea (feeling sick)
  • Vomiting
  • Feeling full after drinking
  • Your bowels do not open for more than 2 days
  • A feeling of ‘tightness’ across your stomach
  • Feeling bloated
  • Abdominal (tummy) swelling
  • Abdominal (tummy) pain.

These symptoms could be a sign that your bowel may be blocked. It is important to speak to your dietitian so that they can advise you what to do. If you are unable to speak to them immediately, return to Stage 1 and clear fluids only.

After Stage 4

What can I eat and drink after Stage 4?

If you have had previous episodes of bowel obstruction you may need to continue with Stage 4 for an extended period of time. If you are doing well it may be possible to move on from Stage 4. Please always speak to your dietitian before making any changes. They will advise you if it is possible to include other foods and how to do this.

Which foods can increase my risk of a blockage?

It is important to completely avoid the foods that may increase your chance of getting a blockage. We advise that you follow a strict LOW FIBRE diet. This is because fibre is not easily digested and can pass through your bowel in large lumps. It also bulks your stools and makes them solid.

Some foods need to be completely avoided (even if puréed). These include the pips, skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables, wholegrains, pulses and beans, which are not easily digested and may get caught in your bowel. Bread and bread products e.g. crumpets, muffins, doughnuts, also need to be avoided. They can form a bolus (ball) and may not pass through a narrowed space. This can increase your risk of an obstruction.

The foods you are allowed to eat may need to be mashed or puréed. Always check with your dietitian if you are unsure.

Some of the foods on the ‘allowed’ lists may not be suitable in some of the Stages. Always check with your dietitian if you are unsure.

What fruit can I eat?

Foods allowed – limit to ONE portion per day

ALWAYS CHECK IF THESE NEED TO BE PURÉED

Foods to avoid
  • Apples (peeled)
  • Apricots (fresh, peeled)
  • Bananas
  • Mango
  • Melon
  • Nectarines (peeled)
  • Papaya
  • Pears (Peeled)
  • Peaches (peeled)
  • Plums (peeled)
  • Watermelon (no pips)

Other

  • Fruit juice (no bits)
  • PurĂ©ed, stewed or cooked fruit (without skins, pips or stones)
  • Tinned fruit
  • Fruit sauces and coulis with pips removed e.g. sieved raspberry coulis, apple sauce
  • Blackberries
  • Blackcurrants
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries
  • Clementines
  • Coconut
  • Cranberries (fresh and dried)
  • Dates
  • Dried apricots
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Grapes
  • Kiwi
  • Mandarins
  • Oranges
  • Passion fruit
  • Pineapple
  • Pomegranate
  • Prunes
  • Raisins
  • Raspberries
  • Redcurrants
  • Rhubarb
  • Satsumas
  • Strawberries

Other

  • Fruit juice with bits
  • Smoothies

 

Further reading / references

Cancer Research UK www.cancerresearchuk.org

British Dietetic Association http://www.bda.uk.com/resource/malnutrition.html

 

Contact details

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics – 01296 315775

Macmillan Dietetic Service (Oncology Outpatients)-  email: bht.macmillandietitians@nhs.net

Macmillan Community Dietetic Service – email: bht.macmillancommunitydietitians@nhs.net